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Tamron AF 1.4x Teleconverter 35mm Converters

3.6/5 (5 Reviews)


  • Magnification1.4x
    CompatibilityStill Photography
    FocusAutofocus, Manual Focus
    Optical Construction4 Groups / 4 Elements
    Diameter2.6 in.
    Length0.7 in.
    Weight4 oz.
    MPNaf14n700
    Product ID21850284

Product Description



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Reviews 1 - 5 (5 Reviews Total)

User Reviews

Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:5
Submitted by wrktoohrd a Intermediate from VA

Date Reviewed: August 31, 2003

Strengths:    retains autofocus for me anyway

Weaknesses:    when I attach it it is kind of tight to mount

Bottom Line:   
Tamron advertises that you will retain autofocus if the master lens is at least f4.5 or faster but I am using this telecoverter with my Sigma 400mm f5.6 for the canon EF mount and my Canon EOS 10s and this combo still retains autofocus. I find that it does hunt in lower light but when it is nice and bright outside autofocus works fine. The picture quality is acceptable but I try not to shoot film that is above 400, usually 200 or 100 if I am shooting slide film.

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   2-5 years

Price Paid:    $4695.00

Purchased At:   digitalfotoclub.com

Similar Products Used:   my first auto-focus extender, I just switched from Canon FD

Type of photography:   Outdoor


Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:5
Submitted by vanhill a Expert from St. Petersburg, FL, USA

Date Reviewed: February 8, 2003

Strengths:    Inexpensive. Conveys D information for Nikon and other D compatible lenses. Light and sufficiently sharp for all but work where maximum sharpness is needed at the edges of the image. AF was acceptable though not outstanding.

Weaknesses:    Slight corner softness.

Bottom Line:   
After reading some of the other reviews for this teleconverter, I wanted to add my own experience. Unlike some others, I have been delighted with the Tamron 1.4X converter. I used it with a Nikon 80-200 f2.8D to take a picture a few months ago that won a prize in a very competitive contest. I mention this because an often-heard comment had to do with the sharpness of the image (It was a pic of a horned owl.) The owl was deep in shadow and I had to shoot through a chainlink fence. Despite these obstacles, the shot came out beautifully. Since, I have used the lens for numerous other nature shots that have drawn comments for their sharpness. I can see some slight deterioriation of the image in the edge in shots with well-defined lines near the edge but otherwise have found the lens to be entirely satisfactory. The AF function also has been fine. It's true that shots taken with my Nikon lenses without a converter show a bit better definition in the corners but then I couldn't have gotten the closeup of the owl with the 80-200 alone. I have used many converters including Nikon's own. I also have a couple of Kenkos (including the 2x telepro), Vivitar macro and many older converters. I don't think this converter suffers much in comparison to them. I was delighted with my purchase, sufficiently that I bought an identical one for a friend.

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   21+ years

Price Paid:    $55.00

Purchased At:   Cameta

Similar Products Used:   Kenko TelePlus Pro, Vivitar, Kiron, Nikon 201, 301, 16A, many others.

Type of photography:   Outdoor


Overall Rating:4
Value Rating:4
Submitted by kevgre a Intermediate from Harrisburg, PA

Date Reviewed: January 29, 2003

Strengths:    Reasonable cost, decent on better quality lenses.

Weaknesses:    decreases zoom ability. Zoom seeks much more when used with it.

Bottom Line:   
I have used many teleconverters in the past, and frankly gave up on 2.0 converters. I found however, the Tamron 1.4 was acceptable when used with a reasonable quality lens.

I currently used it on a Tamron XR28-300 and did not notice much degradation in the slides I took (dailight shots).

A teleconverter is not for everyone, and using a teleconverter with a lens at it's longest focal length is not recommended.

Rule of thumb is, if you need more zoom, but a better and longer zoom.

I however am a bit cheap, so it works for me.

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   11-20 years

Price Paid:    $149.00

Purchased At:   Family Photo NY

Similar Products Used:   Sigma 1.4x teleconverter, Sigma 2.0 teleconverter

Type of photography:   Outdoor


Overall Rating:3
Value Rating:4
Submitted by Rquiroga a Expert from Corpus Christi, TX USA

Date Reviewed: April 21, 2002

Strengths:    Price and sharpnes on a Nikkor 300.mm f4.5 lens.

Weaknesses:    Not as sharp as my Nikkor 300mm prime.

Bottom Line:   
I was in the process of switching from Olympus Equipment to Nikon. I could not quite afford a 400mm plus lens so I but a old 300mm f4.5 nikkor and added a Tamron 1.4 converter for when I need extra reach photographing ducks. I was pleasantly suprised at the sharpness of this combination. I stll intend to buy a longer lens eventuallyh but this combo has relieved a lot of the rush.

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   21+ years

Price Paid:    $125.00

Purchased At:   Roosevelt Baker

Similar Products Used:   600mm f8 Sigma Mirror lens
400 mm f6.3 Soligor
500mm f8 Canon mirror lens


Type of photography:   Outdoor


Overall Rating:3
Value Rating:4
Submitted by RD Kenwood a Intermediate from CA

Date Reviewed: March 5, 2001

Strengths:    Inexpensive.

Flush front element means it fits just about any lens.

Good performance (see "The Bottom Line" for details.

Nikon D compatible.


Weaknesses:    Slowed down the autofocus speed on my 80-200/2.8D and 300/4. (Keep in mind that these lenses are not known for focusing speed, so take this with a grain of salt.)

Bottom Line:   
The Tamron 1.4x TC + 300/4 produced a 420/5.6 with better optical performance than the Tokina 400/5.6 AT-X AF. However, AF was tediously slow. When used with a zoom, even one considered to be good like the 80-200/2.8D, I found that image quality deteriorated.

I think two factors play big roles in whether or not you are happy with a TC. The first is the lens you match it to. The second is technique. Throw this thing on a cheap and slow 100-300mm zoom and shoot hand-held, and you won't be happy. Use the same combo on a tripod, and you may be more-pleased with the results. I used it a fair amount with a tripod-mounted 100mm macro lens, to increase my working distance just a bit, and it delivered blisteringly sharp images edge-to-edge. I never got results I liked with this TC plus a zoom (even on a tripod) - images always looked soft. So, try it with the lens you're going to use it with most, and realize that it may give better or worse results with different lenses.

Expand full review >>

Duration Product Used:   11-20 years

Similar Products Used:   I once owned a suspiciously similar Promaster 1.7x AF TC - it matched the Tamron's magnification, but was even slower to AF. In 1.4x:
Nikon TC-14b - superb, but manual-focus only and pricey. Fits only telephotos.
Sigma APO 1.4x EX - excellent, supports AF and AF-S (albeit still rather slow on the above lenses), fits only telephotos.


Type of photography:   Other



Reviews 1 - 5 (5 Reviews Total)

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