Mamiya M645 Pro Medium Format

Available At:
M645 Pro

  • Out-of-production 645 SLR camera
  • Meter: average, spot and A/S matrix
  • Interchangeable film backs
  • Changeable screens and viewfinders
  • Motor drive
  • Electronic self timer

  • User Reviews (3)

    Showing 1-3 of 3  
    PerPlunk   Intermediate [Apr 04, 2004]
    Strength:

    - Size and weight are very manageable for hiking. - Very rugged. - Great Mirror-lockup lever. - Very solid interchangeable system that works with a lot of the newer 645 pro stuff. - Good timed shutter from 1/1000 - 4 seconds. - Great spot meter in AE eye level prism. - Beautiful optics with 80mm f/1.9 - Hands free DOF. - Accessories are pretty cheap, including a basic cable shutter release. - Well balanced on a tripod. - Very secure neck strap.

    Weakness:

    - Electronic shutter, so bring an extra battery, but the camera still does allow for a constant 1/60 even without any power.

    This as well is a review of the 645 Super. All in all it's a wonderful camera. I take mostly landscape and wildlife shots and having come from using mostly an older Nikon F system, this thing has everything I don't get with the old Nikon F, as well as with some the other Nikon pro cameras. Right off the bat it has an excellent mirror-lockup lever. To me this is one of the most important features as most of my landscape shots are taken at dawn and dusk @ f/22 for around 1 second to 1/60 of a second. The only lens that I have for this thing currently is the 80mm Mamiya-Sekor f/1.9 C, and it produces some of the best images I have ever taken with great contrast and perfect sharpness. Right on par with some of the very capable older Nikkor primes. The other feature that I highly value is the DOF preview. These are built into the lenses and work perfectly, but they can be a bit tricky to activate, especially with gloves. But, unlike the buttons on the Nikon system, once these things are engaged they stay engaged hands free allowing better alignment of filters and composition. I also use the AE metered prism and love how big and bright it is, as well as the built in spot meter that I find to be a lot more useful then the center-weighted meters that I am used to on the older Nikons. Coupled with a grid focusing screen with a 45 degree split center micro prism, composition and focus are made a lot easier. The multi-exposure switch isn't something that I use a lot, but it's nice to know it's there. I also use the manual winder crank even though I do have the motor crank. I just don't have a need for a motorized film advanced and can't justify the extra bulk. Though I am used to manual cranks on the Nikon F, so a manual crank to me is just natural... The only real complaint that I can have about this thing is the electronic shutter. While it operates flawlessly it does remind me that I do need to carry at least one extra battery while traveling, and the shutter release is a bit more sensitive then I am used to on the mechanical Nikon F. Though this is hardly a complaint as the camera does have a built in ability to a 1/60 manual shutter release even without a battery... The last thing I want to mention is that even though it does seem to be very plasticky, it also seems to be bombproof. Shortly after getting this thing I had to watch as the entire thing fell off a shelf about 5ft to a concrete floor. Except for a few new scratches in an already pretty scratched up used camera, the thing had no damage. Great to know that it can take a beating and keep on kicking.

    Customer Service

    Havn't had the need.

    Similar Products Used: Nikon F. Nikon F2. Nikon N90s.
    OVERALL
    RATING
    5
    VALUE
    RATING
    5
    Available At:
    defraggedMike   Casual [Feb 18, 2003]
    Strength:

    Availibilty of very reasonably priced lenses and accessories (I paid 150 bucks for a used prism finder and a motor drive together in Miami). The machine is rugged and well built, a rotating back would only add to the complexity and cost. The price to results ratio has got to be the best deal in photography.

    Weakness:

    It doesn't say "Hassleblad" on the front, but I'd like to compare my pictures with some taken on the Hassey. One reviewer of the Pro TL asked who really needs the TL feature/ I have to agree with that comment.

    I wanted to comment on the build quality of the Mamiya Pro, and its relevance in todays market IMHO. i was walking down wet stone steps in the rain in Baniass Israel in awe of excavations in the Palace of Agrippas II. I slipped and the tripod hit the stone steps, breaking the small plate that attaches the tripod camera mount (Manfrotto 141 head). The camera really took a shot, impacting on the non AE finder, the back and the front of a 50mm shift lense. At first I didn't much care for the "plasticky" build of the camera and was concerned about durability. I have to say that the camera and lense has survived with some paint scatched off the front of the lense, I am so happy, and relieved. The camera can take a bone headed stunt like that. It faired much better then my elbow and the huge bruise on my butt. this machine is still relevant in the market. For the price of a Sekonic meter, 2 backs, 3 lenses and a 2X TC, I have a system that is perfect for my use and so much less expensive then a new system. A 300 ULD, 50mm shift, a meter, 2X TC and an 80 2.8, 2 backs for less then 2,500 bucks. I am really happy, my f4s sits gathering dust.

    Similar Products Used: none, I'm new to MF
    OVERALL
    RATING
    5
    VALUE
    RATING
    5
    Showing 1-3 of 3  

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