Samsung Galaxy Camera Review – The Camera of the Future

Camera Reviews iPhoneography Point and Shoot Samsung Videos

It’s time to take your food and party Instagram photos to the next level. The Samsung Galaxy Camera is the world’s first camera with a mobile operating system and full mobile connectivity. It runs on Android and uses a SIM card for mobile service. For this review, Samsung provided a camera that works on AT&T’s 4G network. Mobile connectivity means you can upload photos no matter where you are – no Wi-Fi necessary. As long as you’ve got a mobile signal, you can share photos and videos, just like you would with your Smart Phone. What makes the Samsung Galaxy Camera different from a Smart Phone is its larger 1/2.3-inch point-and-shoot sensor and a 21x optical zoom lens with optical image stabilization. Basically – Samsung put an Android operating system into a camera, instead of putting a camera into a Smart Phone. The Samsung Galaxy Camera also has a pop-up flash and a custom camera app that offers full manual controls as well as a suite of scene modes. And of course, since it’s an Android device, you can install whatever apps you want for social networking, photo editing – even music or games. The only thing the Galaxy Camera can’t do is make phone calls – although if you install the Skype app and use a headset, it can do that, too.

Samsung Galaxy Camera - Front & Back

 Review Intro |  Video |  Camera Experience |  Image Quality |  Conclusion


Samsung Galaxy Camera Intro Video:

Price: $499 with a two year mobile contract (AT&T)

    Samsung Galaxy Camera Camera Pros

    • 1/2.3-inch backlit CMOS point-and-shoot camera sensor
    • 21x 23-483mm optical zoom lens with optical image stabilization
    • Android OS with apps
    • Full 4G mobile connectivity
    • Cool custom camera app with P,A,S,M manual controls
    • Beautiful Super AMOLED touchscreen display

    Samsung Galaxy Camera Cons

    • Image quality is disappointing
    • No mobile phone functionality
    • Big compared to comparable point-and-shoot cameras
    • Slow startup
    • Touchscreen controls aren’t as quick as dedicated buttons
    • Saving images to the MicroSD card is confusing
    • Flash is harsh

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About the author: Photo-John

Photo-John, a.k.a. John Shafer, is the managing editor of PhotographyREVIEW.com and has been since the site launched back in 1999. He's an avid outdoor enthusiast and spends as much time as possible on his mountain bike, hiking or skiing in the mountains. He's been taking pictures for ever and ever, and never goes anywhere without a camera.


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  • Kelly Burke says:

    This camera really is the way of the future. I still can’t believe that digital cameras were not released with full mobile connectivity years ago.

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